Things That Make Me Go Hmmmm

July 26, 2015

Things That Make Me Go Hmmmm

 

 

The other day I was watching Dr. Phil and I was really shocked at the product he was promoting. A product called Boots No. 7 Serum that claims to reduce wrinkles. There was even a skin expert on with Dr. Phil also promoting the product for skin health and wrinkle reduction.

First, I'm always, always skeptical whenever I hear of a product that reduces wrinkles, red flags everywhere. My thought is that if there actually was a product that really, truly does reduce wrinkles, wouldn't we know about it? Why would women all over the world be spending thousands trying every product under the sun if there was that one product that actually did get rid of those wrinkles? Humm, good question, right? I used to be that woman trying everything, wrinkles are still here :/ (I've learned to embrace them).

So, in my usual manner, whenever I hear of a product that sounds too good to be true, I always resort to research. So research I did and here's what I found. 

There was one study done on the efficacy of this product. This study was carried out by scientists at the University of Manchester. The conclusion was that this Boots serum was just as effective at stimulating collagen production as tretinoin (a drug that is related to Retiol). That sounds great until you learn that Boots paid for the research, which means they had a vested interest in making sure the study made their product look great. Also, because the study was done "blind" instead of double-blind, the researchers knew who was getting which treatment. This type of study isn't as reliable as double-blind studies because, especially when money is at stake, there is a natural bias toward making sure the product in question comes out in the best possible light. A study paid for by the company selling the product is ALWAYS circumspect. It's not that the study may not be valid, but the bias is present from the beginning and that must always be taken into consideration.

But the most alarming thing I found was he list of ingredients. In reading through the list of ingredients it was filled with every kind of paraben. Wait, isn't it common knowledge by now that parabens are infinitely dangerous? Aren't companies trying to get the paraben OUT of their products? And why would a doctor like Dr. Phil, who because of his high visibility, does have a moral responsibility to to direct and advise people thoughtfully, why would he promote such a product? I suppose what upset me even more is that this skin expert who is a person who should be concerned with the health of the skin, was promoting this product so enthusiastically. Isn't it incumbent upon her to know what she is promoting?

All questions that made me go hmmm...



3 Responses

Marlene
Marlene

October 27, 2016

Yes, i wondered why Dr. Phil promoted this product, but because he had an expert say how good it was, i was duped into buying two tubes. I do not have many wrinkles, but it did not do a thing for me, what a waste of money…but the thing is, he had this skin care expert on twice saying how good it was? Why would a doctor who is a psycholgist, i believe promote this, did they offer him huge money, and considering his wife sells this type of product would he not promote her product instead?? Mad me go hmmmmm too.

Darian
Darian

October 05, 2016

I saw that Dr Phil episode and actually wrote down the name of the serum so I could go buy it. Now…I won’t be. Thank you

Dale
Dale

September 30, 2016

Is the Serum 7 a product that Dr. Phil or his wife own? If so, they are such whores to pretend to do a segment on his show! Snake oil salespeople. Tell me I am wrong but I smell a dead rar——- and if anybody knows, they stink and you hate them!!!!

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